Christina Blais

Moonstruck

© Christina Blais, Moon Struck, full
© Christina Blais, Moon Struck, full

 

© Christina Blais, Moon Struck, detail
© Christina Blais, Moon Struck, detail

Moonstruck was inspired by the sciences holography, genetics, geology, astronomy and geometry.

The moon is an astronomical body whose crust is mostly made of rock called anorthosite.  When we look at the moon, we see a big rock, maybe with a face.  The moon is always where it should be in the sky, and we draw it with a big circle, with some shading.  Yet, there is enormous complexity to the moon: its core to crust composition, its craters, volcanoes, and swirls, and its orbit.

In Moonstruck, I sought to provide simplicity in making a large rock-like composition; repetition and symmetry demonstrate the divine in its creation. Attaching bits of fabric through stitching reminds me of permanency in the creation.

Each circle was made from a square of improvised fabric, cut into a circle and wedges, rearranged, re-assembled and sewn.

Sun Portrait #3

Local Color Artist - Christina Blais
© Christina Blais, Sun Portrait #3, full

 

© Christina Blais, Sun Portrait #3, detail
© Christina Blais, Sun Portrait #3, detail

Sun Portrait #3 is the companion to Moonstruck.  The sun is a ball of gases that hang together due to the gravitational pull of the sun’s own mass.  Each bit of the gas is there because of all the other bits of gas that are also there: an interdependence. Likewise, this sun is “there” because of the interdependence of the warps and wefts.

In my work, I seek to relay the complexity and perfection of the divine creation. The multitudes of colors, patterns, and fabrics all represent the complexity of nature, while the work’s overall shape and repetition of the ‘yarns’ illustrate composure and deliberateness.